JUNE BERRY
File Size: 56 KB
 
Amelanchier arborea   (F. Michx. ) Fernald
Wildcat Glades Conservation & Audubon Center, Newton County, Missouri
Height: 6-25 feet
Family: Rosaceae - Rose Family
Flowering Period:   March, April
Also Called: Service berry, shad berry.
Trunks: Usually single, occasionally clustered; bark on young trees light gray and smooth, dark gray with shallow furrows on older trees.
Twigs: Reddish-brown, glabrous. Leaf scars narrowly crescent-shaped; bundle scars 3. Terminal bud 2/5 to 1/2 inch long, tip sharply pointed, scales reddish-brown or yellowish-brown; lateral buds flattened, appressed to stem.
Leaves: Alternate, simple, deciduous; petiole 2/5 to 1 inch, glabrous; blade ovate to obovate, 1.6 to 3.6 inches long, 1 to 2 inches wide; bases heart-shaped to rounded, margins finely to coarsely toothed, tip acute to acuminate, upper surface dark green, glabrous, lower surface paler, densely hairy by flowering, sparsely hairy later; emerging leaves densely white tomentose and folded lengthwise.
Flowers: Racemes, short, 1-3 inches, 3-15-flowered, terminating branches. Pedicels 1/3 to 3/5 inch; hypanthium conical, pubescent, 1/10 to 1/8 inch diameter; sepals 5, green, deltoid, 1/10 to 1/8 inch, sharply recurved; petals 5, white, linear to oblong, 2/5 to 4/5 inch, straight or twisted; stamens usually 20; 1/6 to 1/5 inch long; anthers yellow; styles 5, greenish-white, partly united; stigmas head-like.
Fruit: In June; pomes, becoming red, then reddish-purple, spherical, 1/4 to 1/5 inch diameter, glabrous to sparsely pubescent, calyx persistent; seeds numerous, black to dark purple, oval, 18 to 1/6 inch.
Habitat: Open, rocky woods, stream banks, often on steep slopes and tops of bluffs
Distribution: East 1/4 of Kansas
Origin: Native
Uses: Birds eat the fruits. Native Americans used the berries in soups and stews and dried them for winter use. The fruits and infusions of small branches were given to mothers following childbirth to relieve pain and hemorraging.
Comments: Shrub to small tree. The wood is one of the heaviest in North America. It is hard and dark brown with a wide, white sapwood. It is sometimes used for ax handles. Amelanchier is a French name for a European species. The name shad berry alludes to the flowers appearing about the time that shad ascend streams to spawn.

June berry infloresences
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Wildcat Glades Conservation & Audubon Center, Newton County, Missouri
June berry
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Wildcat Glades Conservation & Audubon Center, Newton County, Missouri
June berry
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Wildcat Glades Conservation & Audubon Center, Newton County, Missouri
June berry bud and leaf scar
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Wildcat Glades Conservation & Audubon Center, Newton County, Missouri
June berry buds
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Wildcat Glades Conservation & Audubon Center, Newton County, Missouri
June berry bark
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Wildcat Glades Conservation & Audubon Center, Newton County, Missouri
June berry fruit
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Riley County, Kansas
June berry fruit
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Riley County, Kansas
June berry flowers
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Riley County, Kansas
June berry flowers
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Riley County, Kansas
June berry flowers
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Riley County, Kansas
June berry bark
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Riley County, Kansas
June berry flowers
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Wildcat Glades Conservation & Audubon Center, Newton County, Missouri
June berry flower
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Wildcat Glades Conservation & Audubon Center, Newton County, Missouri
June berry flowers
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Wildcat Glades Conservation & Audubon Center, Newton County, Missouri
June berry bark
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Wildcat Glades Conservation & Audubon Center, Newton County, Missouri