INLAND CEANOTHUS
File Size: 138 KB
 
Ceanothus herbaceus  Raf.
Konza Prairie, Riley County, Kansas
Shrub
Height: Up to 3 feet
Family: Rhamnaceae - Buckthorn Family
Flowering Period:   April, May, June
Stems: Erect or ascending, 1 to several, much-branched; bark grayish brown; new growth densely hairy.
Leaves: Alternate, simple, short-stalked, narrowly elliptic to oblong-lanceolate, 1 to 2.5 inches long, 1/4 to 3/4 inch wide, dark green and nearly glabrous above, paler and hairy below, prominently 3-veined; margins toothed; tips blunt to slightly pointed.
Inflorescences: Panicle-like, rounded, about 4 inches across, open to densely flowered, terminal, on leafy branches of current year's growth.
Flowers: Small, white; calyces with 5 incurved lobes; petals 5, about 1/16 inch long, spoon-shaped, clawed; stamens 5.
Fruits: Capsules, less than 1/6 inch wide, 3-lobed, black; seeds 3, oblong, glabrous, brownish.
Habitat: Open, prairie hillsides, limestone outcrops, partially wooded slopes, and roadsides, on rocky or sandy soils.
Distribution: East 2/3 of Kansas.
Uses: Native Americans made medicinal teas from the leaves and roots and also used the roots for fuel when wood was scarce. The leaves of Ceanothus americanus L. were used as a substitute for black tea during the American Revolution and the Civil War.
Comments: New Jersey tea is drought resistant, with roots that can grow to 15 feet.
 See also American ceanothus

Inland ceanothus inflorescence
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Konza Prairie, Riley County, Kansas
Inland ceanothus
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Konza Prairie, Riley County, Kansas
Inland ceanothus
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Konza Prairie, Riley County, Kansas
Inland ceanothus
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Konza Prairie, Riley County, Kansas
Inland ceanothus flowers
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Konza Prairie, Riley County, Kansas
Inland ceanothus fruit
138 KB
Konza Prairie, Riley County, Kansas