FRAGRANT CUDWEED
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Pseudognaphalium obtusifolium   (L. ) Hilliard & Burtt
[=Gnaphalium obtusifolium L.]
Konza Prairie, Riley County, Kansas
Annual or winter annual
Height: 1-3 feet
Family: Asteraceae - Sunflower Family
Flowering Period:   August, September,October
Also Called: Fragrant everlasting, old-field balsam.
Stems: Erect, 1 to few, branched above, white-woolly.
Leaves: Alternate, simple, sessile, narrowly lanceolate, 1 to 4 inches long, less than 1/2 inch wide, green and mostly glabrous above, white-woolly below; margins often wavy; tips pointed.
Inflorescences: Clusters of 1-5 heads, terminal; heads small; bracts many, overlapping, papery, whitish or rusty brown; tips pointed, blunt, or rounded.
Flowers: Ray florets absent; disk florets in several series, corollas threadlike, dull white.
Fruits: Achenes, oval, glabrous, pale brown, tipped with distinct, tawny, hair-like bristles, enclosing small seed.
Habitat: Dry, open prairies, pastures, old fields, roadsides, open woods, and waste areas, in sandy or rocky soils.
Distribution: East 2/3 of Kansas.
Uses: Native Americans used fragrant cudweed to treat colds, coughs, muscle cramps, sore throats, and fevers.
Comments: The plant has a maple-like fragrance when dried.

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